Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite Young Adult Books I’ve Read Recently


Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s topic is favorite books in ______ genre. But, I’m a rebel, and I’m not going to do that. So, here are my favorite young adult/middlegrade books I’ve read in the past few months.



Great Recent YA/MG Reads





More Happy Than Not – Adam Silvera

The Leteo Institute's revolutionary memory-relief procedure seems too good to be true to Aaron Soto—miracle cure-alls don't tend to pop up in the Bronx projects. But Aaron can't forget how he's grown up poor or how his friends aren't always there for him. Like after his father committed suicide in their one-bedroom apartment. Aaron has the support of his patient girlfriend, if not necessarily his distant brother and overworked mother, but it's not enough.  
Then Thomas shows up. He has a sweet movie-watching setup on his roof, and he doesn't mind Aaron's obsession with a popular fantasy series. There are nicknames, inside jokes. Most importantly, Thomas doesn't mind talking about Aaron's past. But Aaron's newfound happiness isn't welcome on his block. Since he can't stay away from Thomas or suddenly stop being gay, Aaron must turn to Leteo to straighten himself out, even if it means forgetting who he is.  





The Game of Love and Death – Martha Brockenbrough

Antony and Cleopatra. Helen of Troy and Paris. Romeo and Juliet. And now . . . Henry and Flora.  
For centuries Love and Death have chosen their players. They have set the rules, rolled the dice, and kept close, ready to influence, angling for supremacy. And Death has always won. Always.  
Could there ever be one time, one place, one pair whose love would truly tip the balance?  
Meet Flora Saudade, an African-American girl who dreams of becoming the next Amelia Earhart by day and sings in the smoky jazz clubs of Seattle by night. Meet Henry Bishop, born a few blocks and a million worlds away, a white boy with his future assured—a wealthy adoptive family in the midst of the Great Depression, a college scholarship, and all the opportunities in the world seemingly available to him.  
The players have been chosen. The dice have been rolled. But when human beings make moves of their own, what happens next is anyone’s guess.





A Long Way From Chicago – Richard Peck

What happens when Joey and his sister, Mary Alice—two city slickers from Chicago—make their annual summer visits to Grandma Dowdel's seemingly sleepy Illinois town?  
August 1929: They see their first corpse, and he isn't resting easy. 
August 1930: The Cowgill boys terrorize the town, and Grandma fights back. 
August 1931: Joey and Mary Alice help Grandma trespass, poach, catch the sheriff in his underwear, and feed the hungryall in one day.





Echo – Pam Muñoz Ryan

Lost and alone in a forbidden forest, Otto meets three mysterious sisters and suddenly finds himself entwined in a puzzling quest involving a prophecy, a promise, and a harmonica. Decades later, Friedrich in Germany, Mike in Pennsylvania, and Ivy in California each, in turn, become interwoven when the very same harmonica lands in their lives. All the children face daunting challenges: rescuing a father, protecting a brother, holding a family together. And ultimately, pulled by the invisible thread of destiny, their suspenseful solo stories converge in an orchestral crescendo. 





Terrible Typhoid Mary: A True Story of the Deadliest Cook in America – Susan Campbell Bartoletti

What happens when a person's reputation has been forever damaged?

With archival photographs and text among other primary sources, this riveting biography of Mary Mallon by the Sibert medalist and Newbery Honor winner Susan Bartoletti looks beyond the tabloid scandal of Mary's controversial life.

How she was treated by medical and legal officials reveals a lesser-known story of human and constitutional rights, entangled with the science of pathology and enduring questions about who Mary Mallon really was.

How did her name become synonymous with deadly disease? And who is really responsible for the lasting legacy of Typhoid Mary?






Nimona – Noelle Stevenson

Nimona is an impulsive young shapeshifter with a knack for villainy. Lord Ballister Blackheart is a villain with a vendetta. As sidekick and supervillain, Nimona and Lord Blackheart are about to wreak some serious havoc. Their mission: prove to the kingdom that Sir Ambrosius Goldenloin and his buddies at the Institution of Law Enforcement and Heroics aren't the heroes everyone thinks they are.  
But as small acts of mischief escalate into a vicious battle, Lord Blackheart realizes that Nimona's powers are as murky and mysterious as her past. And her unpredictable wild side might be more dangerous than he is willing to admit.





The Thing About Jellyfish – Ali Benjamin

After her best friend dies in a drowning accident, Suzy is convinced that the true cause of the tragedy must have been a rare jellyfish sting—things don't just happen for no reason. Retreating into a silent world of imagination, she crafts a plan to prove her theory—even if it means traveling the globe, alone. Suzy's achingly heartfelt journey explores life, death, the astonishing wonder of the universe . . . and the potential for love and hope right next door.





Stuck in Neutral – Terry Trueman

Shawn McDaniel is an enigma and a miracle—except no one knows it, least of all his father. His life is not what it may seem to anyone looking at him. Not even those who love him best have any idea what he is truly like. In this extraordinary and powerful first novel, the reader learns to look beyond the obvious and finds a character whose spirit is rich beyond imagining and whose story is unforgettable.





Saving Wonder – Mary Knight

Having lost most of his family to coal-mining accidents as a little boy, Curley Hines lives with his grandfather in the Appalachian Mountains of Wonder Gap, Kentucky. Ever since Curley can remember, Papaw has been giving him a word each week to learn and live. Papaw says words are Curley's way out of the holler, even though Curley has no intention of ever leaving.  
When a new coal boss takes over the local mining company, life as Curley knows it is turned upside down. Suddenly, his best friend, Jules, is interested in the coal boss's son, and worse, the mining company threatens to destroy Curley and Papaw's mountain. Now Curley faces a difficult choice. Does he use his words to speak out against Big Coal and save his mountain, or does he remain silent and save his way of life?





Unwind – Neal Shusterman

The Second Civil War was fought over reproductive rights. The chilling resolution: Life is inviolable from the moment of conception until age thirteen. Between the ages of thirteen and eighteen, however, parents can have their child "unwound," whereby all of the child's organs are transplanted into different donors, so life doesn't technically end. Connor is too difficult for his parents to control. Risa, a ward of the state, is not enough to be kept alive. And Lev is a tithe, a child conceived and raised to be unwound. Together, they may have a chance to escape and to survive.




What is the last great YA/MG book you read?







14 comments:

  1. These are all new to me. I really enjoyed the idea of The Game of Love and Death, I'll have to look into that one.

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  2. Glad to see you loved More Happy Than Not! Can't wait to get to it!

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  3. GAH!! More Happy Than Not and The Thing About Jellyfish are just SITTING on my shelf!! I need to get to those soon!!!

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  4. I loved Nimona sooooo very much, such a great spin on the traditional good guy-bad guy fairy tale tropes.

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  5. These titles are all new to me, but several of them like Echo and Stuck in Neutral sound amazing!

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  6. These are all great picks! I've heard of a few of them, but I haven't really read any of them yet. Hopefully I can change that soon!

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  7. Terrible Typhoid Mary was much better than I expected it to be! Great choices.

    Check out my TTT.

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  8. Nimona was so brilliant and hilarious! I was a little disappointed with More Happy Than Not, but nonetheless still a great read. Cool list~

    My TTT ft. Aliens.

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  9. I haven't read any of these but I am really interested in The Game of Love and Death after your review! Great list :D

    Here are my Top Ten!

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  10. Yess to More Happy Than Not and Nimona!! And now you've gotten me really interested in reading Echo. You've been featuring it quite frequently, so you must have really liked it. :]

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  11. Ohh I love Unwind!! And I want to read Nimona and More Happy Than Not SO SO BADLY!! *flails* They sound amazing. :D

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  12. Unwind was great, and I have Nimona and More Happy Than Not on my shelves. I'm totally going to look up The Game of Love and Death and the Typhoid Mary book!

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  13. I really enjoyed Nimona! So good with amazing illustrations :)

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  14. You know how I feel about Unwind (Best. Series. Ever.) - that's actually the only one I've read off this list. I'm really curious about the Typhoid Mary book.

    Nicole @ Feed Your Fiction Addiction

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