Friday, October 31, 2014

Best Book Of October

Happy Halloween!


This month, I mostly read books by George Eliot. I posted about Middlemarch a few weeks ago, and my favorite George Eliot book is below. The summary is from Amazon, and the review is mine.

Silas Marner: The Weaver of Raveloe - George Eliot

Silas Marner: The Weaver of Raveloe is the third novel by George Eliot, published in 1861. An outwardly simple tale of a linen weaver, it is notable for its strong realism and its sophisticated treatment of a variety of issues ranging from religion to industrialisation to community. The novel is set in the early years of the 19th century. Silas Marner, a weaver, is a member of a small Calvinist congregation in Lantern Yard, a slum street in an unnamed city in Northern England. He is falsely accused of stealing the congregation's funds while watching over the very ill deacon. Two clues are given against Silas: a pocket-knife and the discovery in his own house of the bag formerly containing the money. There is the strong suggestion that Silas' best friend, William Dane, has framed him, since Silas had lent his pocket-knife to William shortly before the crime was committed. Silas is proclaimed guilty. The woman he was to marry casts him off, and later marries William Dane. With his life shattered and his heart broken, Silas leaves Lantern Yard and the city.
 
In 1800s England, a lonely man adopts a child who changes his life and teaches him about the kindness of his neighbors.

I've read several of George Eliot's books, and this one is my favorite (so far). It's not very long, the plot is fairly straightforward, and there aren't a ton of characters. Compared to other British classics, it's an easy book to understand.

I don't have too many complaints about this novel. The biggest challenge for me was reading the dialect. There is a lot of dialect, and a
Review: In 1800s England, a lonely weaver adopts a child who changes his life and teaches him about the kindness of his neighbors.

I've read several of George Eliot's books, and this one is my favorite (so far). It's not very long, the plot is fairly straightforward, and there aren't a ton of characters. Compared to other British classics, it's an easy book to understand.

I don't have too many complaints about this novel. The biggest challenge for me was reading the dialect. There is a lot of dialect, and a few times I had no idea what the characters were saying. Also, like Eliot's other novels, this one takes a while to get going. But once the story does start moving, it's easy to get caught up in it.

If you are new to reading classics, I'd highly recommend this one.



~*~

All The Things = 16 books. All The Things is starting to remind me of a mythological monster. The books regenerate as quickly as I can slay them.

I’m Currently Reading: Seductive Poison: A Jonestown Survivor’s Story of Life and Death in the People’s Temple by Deborah Layton.

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